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10 Plants to Improve Indoor Air Quality in Your Home 

 May 11, 2021

By  Gabriela

We use houseplants usually for decoration. But did you know that there are a lot of otherwise gorgeous house plants to improve indoor air quality in your home, and help you retain a balanced level of humidity in it? Yes, there are. The quality of time we spent in our homes can continuously improve by improving the air we breathe inside.

The plants in our house can help us improve our indoor air quality by managing a cleaner atmosphere in our homes, cleaning the indoor air, supplying us with fresh oxygen, and stabilizing the humidity in the home.

Homes like these are a must if you have children living with you or people with allergies. Here are ten amazing plants to improve indoor air quality in your home.

Plants to Improve Indoor Air Quality for Moist Home Environments

#1: Myrtle Or Myrtus

Our first of the plants to improve indoor air quality is a plant that is a peace symbol in Japan. In their old folklore, the plant represented a holy herb that retrieves the youth of the elderly and brings happiness and prosperity to travelers on their journeys.

Nowadays, it is medically proven that it can stabilize the micro-climate in its surroundings by killing harmful microbes in the air. It achieves this by releasing phytoncides from its flowers and leaves in the air.

#2: Coffea Arabica

Coffee shrubs need lots of shade and lots of water. They are an excellent absorber of additional moisture in your house. When they flower, they can release a beautiful scent that will turn your home into a tropical garden.

And, you will also get to grow your coffee! Coffee arabica begins to bear fruits usually after its fifth or sixth year, so if you want the coffee benefits from your plan, you might consider purchasing an already matured Coffee arabica.

#3: Peace Lily Or Spathiphyllum

A favorite among weddings, the elegant peace lily brings love and happiness to homes it grows in. But don’t let the name fool you. Peace lily can quickly destroy mold spores in the air. Spores of mold often bring down the quality of air and make us sick.

Room temperature at about 18 degrees Celsius is optimal for the lily.

#4: Lemon Tree Or Citrus Limon

Lemon trees are a great addition to your garden. Its blooming flowers in the spring will sweep your home with a pleasant lemony scent. You can even keep it next to your window.

Its health benefits are suction of excess moisture which will leave a lot cleaner air in your home.

Also, lemon leaves have active sterilization properties that spill out to space it occupies. The tree is ideal for people with allergies. Make sure the lemon tree gets plenty of water and sunlight, steadily grounded in dry soil.

#5: Bay Tree Or Laurus Nobilis

Leaves of the Bay tree are widely used in Asian cuisine as a flavoring herb after dried in the sun. The Bay tree is an old plant. Herbivore dinosaurs loved munching them in between breaks from running away from raptors.

Yep, the bay tree is timeworn. You can use it to stabilize the indoor climate of your home with moisture absorption from the air. It can thrive in a place in your home with moderate shade, moist air, and plenty of warm water.

Plants to Improve Indoor Air Quality for Dry Home Environments

#6: Mother-In-Law’s Tongue Or Sansevieria

Known by many more cool-sounding names, this plant can help freshen the air by creating a lot of oxygen in your home. It also counterbalances the adverse smoke that comes from many materials made from synthetic chemicals.

The plant also retains quite a bit of moisture which means you don’t have to water it down much. Keep it anywhere in your home without worrying about appropriate light or shade. Truly a proper low maintenance plant!

#7: False Cypress Or Chamaecyparis

A favorite among bonsai enthusiasts, the false cypress blesses your dry home environment by giving it much-needed moisture and by removing dirt and dust particles that drift in the air.

When placed in your home allegedly, this plant can also relieve you from headaches and migraines. It needs regular watering and shade.

Originally coming from Japan, the legend says that this plant keeps the souls of the gods and the deceased. There it is also considered a sacred tree.

#8: Cissus Creeper

Having most of the characteristics of an ivy plant or a creeper, this plant can quickly spread and cover everything around it with its luscious leaves. It grows toward the light, so keep that in mind if you regularly relocate it to different parts of the house it can grow in a lot of different ways.

It also needs shade and a lot of water. When placed in an environment with dry air, it can quickly work to stabilize the micro-climate. The plant achieves this by providing a perfect amount of moisture to the air.

#9: Widow’s Thrill Or Kalanchoe

Originally from Madagascar, this plant is an excellent choice for any home environment that requires moisture with its leaves.

It is effective at regulating the climate inside its surroundings, which can be your home or office. Make sure not to over-water the plant and keep it in a place with the proper amount of sunshine.

#10: Ficus

Ficus is a very popular indoor plant. As a houseplant, it can expend a lot of moisture and oxygen. Having the ability to neutralize bacteria, toxins, and viruses, it can thrive happily wherever you keep it. Although, keeping it in a shady place can help grow better.

This plant can grow very quickly, and it doesn’t require much care. Keep a moderate watering, not too dry and not too moist. And it would help if you live in a warm place because it can grow harder in cold conditions.

This plant symbolically represents the city of Bangkok, Thailand. Its most popular sort is the Benjamin fig (Ficus Benjamina, weeping fig), named by Benjamin Maggot Forster, a famous botanist from London, UK.

Source: Better Homes
Image Source: Allergy & Air

About the author 

Gabriela

A mom of two with a background in journalism, I took health into my own hands and started researching to find answers to my own health struggles. My research turned into a blog that turned into an amazing community (starring you!).When I'm not reading medical journals, creating new recipes, you can find me somewhere outside in the sun or undertaking some DIY remodeling project that inevitably takes twice as long as it was supposed to.

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